Monday, 15 September 2014
sierramckenzie:

This is hard for me to post but I feel like it is important. I remember hating my face and hating my skin and looking at all the girls around me in middle school and on tv and in ads and feeling like I was a monstrosity in comparison. But I remember the first time I realized women plucked their eyebrows. And wore concealer. And foundation. And powder. I felt like I had been lied to about what women look like. After modeling and realizing when photographers asked for no makeup, they really meant the photo on the right. I started realizing that the photo on the right was what was in skincare ads and posted by people claiming in the caption to be wearing no makeup some of the time. The photo on the right is the bare minimum of what we expect women to look like when they wake up in the morning. I think makeup can be empowering, but I think that acknowledging that it isn’t natural is important. Modeling and wearing makeup so often makes me especially feel like its important to sometimes be uncomfortably honest about how much of the media we consume is altered in some way. Part of me wanted to wait until my skin was better to do this concept but I realized that was totally missing the point. Thanks for taking the time to read.Photography and Graphic Design by Mark Laubenheimer.

sierramckenzie:

This is hard for me to post but I feel like it is important. 

I remember hating my face and hating my skin and looking at all the girls around me in middle school and on tv and in ads and feeling like I was a monstrosity in comparison. But I remember the first time I realized women plucked their eyebrows. And wore concealer. And foundation. And powder. I felt like I had been lied to about what women look like. After modeling and realizing when photographers asked for no makeup, they really meant the photo on the right. I started realizing that the photo on the right was what was in skincare ads and posted by people claiming in the caption to be wearing no makeup some of the time. The photo on the right is the bare minimum of what we expect women to look like when they wake up in the morning. 

I think makeup can be empowering, but I think that acknowledging that it isn’t natural is important. Modeling and wearing makeup so often makes me especially feel like its important to sometimes be uncomfortably honest about how much of the media we consume is altered in some way. 

Part of me wanted to wait until my skin was better to do this concept but I realized that was totally missing the point. 

Thanks for taking the time to read.

Photography and Graphic Design by Mark Laubenheimer.

Sunday, 14 September 2014
humansofnewyork:

A bit of context on this next series of photos: Dharamshala, India is where the exiled government of Tibet resides. Led by the Dalai Lama, nearly 100,000 Tibetan refugees live in this northern Indian city, where they seek to maintain their traditions and culture in exile. The long journey from Tibet to India includes a grueling 28 day walk through the Himalayan mountains. Many of the refugees make this trek as children, sent by their parents in hopes of studying their language and religion in freedom. In conclusion, here’s a young Tibetan monk playing with a kitten.
(Dharamshala, India)

humansofnewyork:

A bit of context on this next series of photos: Dharamshala, India is where the exiled government of Tibet resides. Led by the Dalai Lama, nearly 100,000 Tibetan refugees live in this northern Indian city, where they seek to maintain their traditions and culture in exile. The long journey from Tibet to India includes a grueling 28 day walk through the Himalayan mountains. Many of the refugees make this trek as children, sent by their parents in hopes of studying their language and religion in freedom. In conclusion, here’s a young Tibetan monk playing with a kitten.

(Dharamshala, India)

hoploid:

LINK

/// For VISUAL INSPIRATION in illustration, graphic design, packaging, art and a lot more … just follow HOPLOID ON TUMBLR.
Thank You! ///

architectureofdoom:

The House of Yagi, Hiroshima, Suppose Design Office, 2012

architectureofdoom:

The House of Yagi, Hiroshima, Suppose Design Office, 2012

thepianogirl1:

And in that moment, everybody in the theater let out a huge sigh of relief as they realized what had just happened; for the first time in forever there was no forced romance between the protagonists in an action movie. 
The heavens finally answered the prayers of the people. 

atdirmaq:

Kotori Kawashima’s stunning portraits of his young daughter are collected in his book, Mirai Chan.

Saturday, 13 September 2014
Thursday, 11 September 2014
 
Old